Pets

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4min200

When you talk about automotive luxury, Rolls Royce is in a class of it’s own. Their works always stand out wherever you find them. Their presence can’t just be overstated.

The luxury brand didn’t start five or six decades ago; they have been here for over a century.

On 4 May 1904, Charles Rolls and Henry Royce met for the first time at The Midland Hotel, Manchester; an encounter that would change the course of automotive history.

Exactly 115 years later, the marque they agreed to form that day continues to set global standards for innovation and excellence, and uphold their legacy as the originators of ‘the best car in the world’.

Rolls and Royce would doubtless be astonished at the cars produced under their names in 2019. The century (and more) that has elapsed since their first 10hp machine made its debut at the Paris Salon has seen materials, technology and manufacturing methods utterly transformed.

Yet in several key areas, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars retains unbroken links to those pioneering days; and in its approach, instincts and values, it would be immediately – and pleasingly – recognisable to its founding fathers.

Henry Royce began his automotive career by building an improved version of the 10hp two-cylinder French Decauville – the first car he bought when his eponymous electrical company became successful.

When Rolls saw and drove Royce’s machine, he knew he had found a British car that could outshine the continental competition and agreed to sell all the cars Royce could build. In its first two years, Rolls-Royce produced a mere 10 cars: in 2018, it delivered 4,107 – the highest annual total in its history – to customers in over 50 countries.

Rolls-Royce once again produced a car capable of conquering the most hostile environments on Earth. The Cullinan super-luxury SUV caused an international sensation on its launch in 2018, and set the new global standard in luxury off-road motoring.

Cullinan was engineered from scratch to enable customers to go anywhere, see anything and do everything they desire with total confidence, while cocooned in the comfort and splendour embodied in the Rolls-Royce name.

To prove its all-terrain credentials, the car completed a 12,000-mile odyssey through some of the world’s most challenging terrain, in partnership with National Geographic.

As well as the Scottish Highlands, the Austrian Alps and the American West, Cullinan’s itinerary included the arid wastes of the Middle East, where it effortlessly confirmed Lawrence’s assertion that ‘a Rolls in the desert is above rubies.’

“We are deeply conscious of our heritage: it is a tremendous privilege to be continuing and building on work that began 115 years ago,” says Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive, Rolls‑Royce Motor Cars. “But we also understand that our founders were visionaries, always looking to do things in new and different ways. It’s that spirit of excellence and innovation that Rolls-Royce Motor Cars embodies and celebrates today.”


Akeem ReachnaijaMarch 28, 2019
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2min590
This is the most expensive snake in the world. It is also one of the most expensive pets anyone can own. Meet the Lavender Ball Python. Only the super rich crave for such pets.

The Lavender Ball Python is a wonderful reptile that can impress even the most demanding pet lovers in the world, writes Richieast.

Its aspect is definitely an interesting one. It has yellow spots on a lavender backdrop and piercing red eyes that complement the wonderful natural color palate. This particular aspect appears due to a color mutation, thanks to a recessive genetic trait and this anomaly makes it even more interesting in the eyes of collectors.

This fabulous pet, is originally from Africa and it was considered the most expensive pet in the world for decades. Meanwhile, Lavender Albino Ball Python has lost this title but it’s still a luxury pet taking into consideration the fact that it costs somewhere around $40.000(about N14 million).

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Akeem ReachnaijaFebruary 21, 2019
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2min590

The Manager of Imo State Zoological Garden, Dr Francis Abioye, has cautioned Nigerians against killing protected animals including reptiles like python, saying doing so would attract jail term.

Abioye gave the warning on Thursday when he mobilised members of the zoo task force to arrest a resident of Nekede autonomous community in Owerri West Local Government Area of Imo, accused of killing a python.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the suspect, Mike Uzoma, allegedly killed the python and sold it on Wednesday.

The area where the python was killed is less than a kilometer away from the zoo.

However by the time the task force members got the community to effect the arrest, the suspect had fled.

The manager who addressed members of the community cautioned them against such act, explaining that all animals around the conservation area are protected by law.

Abioye warned that anybody who kills a python or any animal protected by the law will be arrested and prosecuted.

“I have come to educate all of you against the habit of killing animals that are protected by the law.

“Anybody caught killing such animal must be jailed because we cannot continue to watch people destroy our nature out of ignorance”, he said.

Abioye said rather than kill such animals, the residents should contact the zoo curator to capture them.

Some of the residents, who spoke, commended the manager for coming to educate them on why some special animals must be protected.

One of them, Mrs Angela Amaefula said she was ignorant of the law prohibiting the killing of some animals like python, and urged the zoo manager to make such enlightenment programme a regular event.

According to her, doing so would enable members of the public to become fully aware of the need to be friendly with such animals. (NAN)


Akeem ReachnaijaDecember 11, 2018
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2min560

1. There are three distinct species of elephant left in the world: The Asian elephant and Africa has the forest and savannah elephant species.

2. The word “elephant” comes from the Greek word “elephas” which means “ivory”.

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3. The elephant’s gestation period is 22 months – longer than any other land animal in the world. A new born human baby weighs an average of 7 pounds while a new born elephant baby can weigh up to 260 pounds! The baby can stand up shortly after being born.

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4. The oldest known elephant in the world lived for 86 years (1917 – 2003). The average lifespan of an elephant is from 50 to 70 years. The largest known elephant was shot in Angola in 1956 and weighed about 24 000 pounds! It had a shoulder height of 3.96 metres!

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5. The tusks of an elephant are modified incisors that grow throughout an elephant’s lifetime. An adult male’s tusks grow about 7 inches a year. Tusks are used to dig for salt, water and roots, to debark trees, to clear a path and occasionally in fights. Additionally, they are used for marking trees to establish an elephant’s territory.

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6. The elephant’s trunk is a fusion of its nose and upper lip. It is the elephant’s most important limb. The trunk is sensitive enough to pick up a blade of grass and strong enough to rip the branches off a tree. The trunk is also used for drinking – the elephant can suck up to 14 litres of water at a time and then blow it straight into its mouth!

When bathing, the elephant sucks water to spray on its body. It will then spray dirt and mud on its wet coat, which will dry and act as sunscreen.

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7. Elephants have two gaits – a walk and a faster gait that is similar to running. They cannot jump, trot or gallop, however they can swim and use their trunk as a snorkel.